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View PCI - File Encryption Tool

Category:Security

How to get and use AES Crypt

According to PCI Compliance requirements, any sensitive data that is exported from a clients Hudson system, or is on the network and going to be imported into the clients system, whether stored temporarily or for longer periods of time MUST be stored in an encrypted format. Sensitive client data is always encrypted when stored inside the Hudson database but might be discoverable if exported and stored externally. When exporting any sensitive data from your system you should take steps to encrypt that information to insure data security.  This can be accomplished using an application named AES Crypt.  The application is easy to use, is available for Windows, Linux and Mac and is free open source. It may be downloaded at www.aescrypt.com.

Installing on a Mac

Installing is done in the traditional manner - click the download link at the site above and the application is downloaded to your Downloads folder.  Open the folder and run the installer package. It is a very small file and installs nearly instantly.  NOTE: Once installed, you don’t launch it as you do other applications on a Mac. In fact, clicking the application icon (padlock icon) has no effect.  Using Finder, browse to your applications folder. Right click on the Aescrypt.app icon and select Make Alias. Take the alias and drag to a desired location on your Dock.
AES_Dock_Icon.png

Using on a Mac

Encryption of a file is done by dragging the file onto the AES Crypt padlock icon on the Dock.
You will then be prompted to enter a password. NOTE: You are asked for the password once - be careful in how you enter since if you mistype an intended password, you will not have the opportunity to correct it.  If you mistype your password, then delete your original file, you may not be able to decrypt the file later.        AES_Mac_Password.png
After entering the password to be used (the current Hudson software password), AESCrypt creates a copy of the file, stored in the same location as the original, and appends the file name with “.aes”..

AES_FinderView.pngAES_FinderView.png


At this point, you should securely delete your original file (including emptying the trash) so that only the file with the .aes file extension remains.  This file may be stored for as long as needed, but should then be deleted as well.

Decrypting a file is done by dragging the file onto the AES Crypt padlock icon on the Dock. You may also right-click the file and select Open With > AES Crypt.app. When dragged to the AESCrypt icon, you will be prompted to enter the password used to perform the original encryption.  Once the password is entered correctly, AES Crypt creates a copy of the file, stored in the same location as the original, and appends the file name with “.xls, .csv, .doc” etc., depending on the format of the original document, prior to its encryption.

Using on Windows

Encryption of a file is done by right-clicking on the original or source file and selecting “AES Encrypt”.
Windows_AES_Encrypt.png

You will be prompted for the password twice this time (the current Hudson software password). AES Crypt creates a copy of the file, stored in the same location as the original, and appends the file name with “.aes”.. At this point, you should securely delete your original file (including emptying the trash) so that only the file with the .aes file extension remains.  This file may be stored for as long as needed, but should then be deleted as well.


Decrypting a file is done by right-clicking on the original or source file and selecting “AES Decrypt”.
Windows_AES_Decrypt.png

You will be prompted to enter the password used to perform the original encryption.  Once the password is entered correctly, AES Crypt creates a copy of the file, stored in the same location as the original, and appends the file name with “.xls, .csv, .doc” etc., depending on the format of the original document, prior to its encryption.

Result of Encryption

Once a file is encrypted, regardless of the original file format, the resulting file will appear as jumbled text and codes that will be illegible.  For example, the following rtf document was encrypted with AES Crypt.

AES_BeforeEncryption.png

And the result after encryption (when viewed with a generic text editor):

AES_AfterEncryption.png

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